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Flowering Rosemary branchesBotanical Name:  rosmarinus officianalis

Description:

The spiny leaves and blue flowers of the shrub are used to produce the essential oil.  The plant is native to the Mediterranean area and grows up to 6 feet.  It was one of the first distilled essential oils, first processed in 1330. 

Rosemary Technical Information

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Non-therapeutic Uses:

As a symbol of remembrance and fidelity. Used in soaps, cosmetics, perfumes, and deodorants.  Used in hair preparations as a curl enhancer. Used as an herbal substitute for caffeine.

Fragrance Family:  Herbal
Perfumery Note:  Middle

Fragrance Description:

Herbaceous and tending toward medicinal, Rosemary also has a rich savory component.  The fragrance is invigorating in a rustic, earthy way.  It is a classic men’s fragrance because of its vigorousness.  In aromatherapy, it is used for improving concentration and thought clarity.

Jen’s blending notes:

One of my favorites from the herbal family, Rosemary is another oil that I love on its own.  It blends extremely well with anything that tends toward herbaceous.

There is a camphorous note to Rosemary, so the more delicate florals sometimes get lost in the blend. 

Some people combine rosemary with other powerful spices and medicinal oils like clove, nutmeg, and tea tree, but to me this is overpowering.

Jen’s soapmaking notes:

Rosemary in soap smells wonderful.  You can use the least expensive oil, it loses the camphor during soapmaking and leaves the yummy fresh herbal fragrance as the main impression.

Rosemary actually slows trace, I have used it when additives are known to speed trace to slow down the process. 

Rosemary also enhances the hardness of a bar.  I use it with oils that are known to soften the soap texture, like Lemongrass, to keep the resulting product from being too soft.